Saturday, August 5, 2017

Two Historical Fiction Novels! ~ My Reviews!

Hiya peeps! I've got two interesting novels today, for a virtual blog tour organized by Roger Charlie.

These books are fitting for anyone who enjoys historical fiction. One focuses on the lives of two people living in 20th century NYC, and how their lives unfold for a time. The second is the sequel, where this couple join a few others in dealing with the post Pearl Harbor bombing, as the U.S. enters WWII.

Be sure to check them out, and see my review for each book below! =D



 Sheldon Friedman
Sheldon Friedman was born in St. Joseph Missouri. He lives in Denver, Colorado. He is a University of Denver graduate and practiced law in Denver until 2008. He taught legal courses at the University of Colorado Law School, University of Denver Law School and Daniels School of Business at the University of Denver. After leaving his law firm he joined a national mediation and arbitration firm until January, 2016. He is also an accomplished playwright, having a number of local readings and productions. His play The Long Goodbye was staged at Denver's Crossroad's Theater in 2010. His book, The Velvet Prison was named as a 2017 fiction award finalist by the Colorado Author's League.

~ Connect with Sheldon Online ~




The Velvet Prison


 The Velvet Prison
~Released: September 14th, 2016

~Length: 244 Pages

~Genres: Historical Fiction

~Parent's Guide: PG-17


Against the pulsating back drop of a New York City in social and economic change, young Travis Kane struggles with his passion to be an artist painter, and the conservative demands of his strict grandfather, Barclay Kane.

His mother, unable to come to terms with tragedy, has taken Travis’s infant sister and abandons him, leaving their house in Gramercy Park, and Travis to be raised by the grandfather he adores.

Travis enters a New York speakeasy, with a unique idea, that will change his life, leading him on an exciting journey, meeting Manhattan’s privileged, studying in art in Paris and, finding his way to Broadway.

Meanwhile, Lindsay Wayne’s mother, seamstress, has a secret, and a passion. Her daughter will become a famous stage actress, and this is her focus.

Lindsay and Travis’s worlds collide.
Their lives will never be the same again.





A flashback to the past.

History has always fascinated me. I adore learning new ways people used to survive and thrive - how did life used to look? It's hard to believe where this book starts off is already a hundred years ago, especially considering how relatable the characters and their life are.

Travis's life is, sadly, all too common. Echoed again and again even in today's current climate, growing up with pain and the constant tension in the world, the threat of war constantly looming in the distance. He shows his character in several situations, following his artist's heart, even when life gets surprising and a little messy. The secret thread connecting him and Lindsay was easy to guess, and I supposed a bit predictable from the first few chapters, however I didn't feel as though I missed out. The progression was done well, and revealed in an entertaining way.

I liked Lindsay quite a bit. She was the kind of girl most of us enjoy having in our circle of friends, and is always an interesting person to be around. I enjoyed her personality, and how she interacted with other people. I can't help but take notice of how women are thought to have behaved in the past, and the contrast between her Hannah were striking, given their relationship. I think she was naive for constantly defending Hannah, instead of admitting the woman needed some help, and being more realistic about the overall situation. Still, it fit her personality to be a bit stubborn, and was more of a character trait than an actual complaint.

In the same ways the author described Travis painting, he created this book with a lot of color, making it easy to see what is meant to be important. The focus isn't so much the state of the war, or any particular country. It isn't a political statement piece, but rather a look into what an ordinary life would have looked like, and a taste of reality, from the view point of some well-created characters. Each one grew quite a bit, and were defined very well throughout the story.

My only complaint, is that the story lagged somewhat in a few places, with a bit too much emphasis was put on keeping things 'mysterious' for the reader, while other places felt far too rushed. It seems as though details could have been explained a in a more crisp manner, and the flow balanced better. Even so, the story overall was entertaining, and I would recommend it to other historical fiction fans.

*I was given a complimentary eCopy of this book, from the author, to read in exchange for an honest review.



The Satin Sash


 The Satin Sash
~Released: April 4th, 2017

~Length: 198 Pages

~Genres: Historical Fiction

~Parent's Guide: PG-17


After the Japanese attack Pearl Harbor in 1941, American lives change dramatically. The Satin Sash continues the breathtaking lives of Travis Kane, Lindsay Wayne and Jean-Paul Renault with all the inherent dangers of the French Resistance, President Roosevelt’s live or die missions, and death defying action when German spies secretly enter the US through it’s ports. A wedding reception and the lives of Travis Kane and his family are thrown into chaos as America enters World War II.

The Satin Sash is set against the explosive backgrounds of New York, France, London and Ireland. Travis Kane becomes President Roosevelt’s tool in bringing one of the world’s most famous paintings to New York. Racial tensions surface. A famous black activist enters politics and an actress makes choices in the face of heartbreaking tragedy. A public enemy serves his country in wartime and a black artist becomes famous. When a baby is born the future shows promise.

With tension, suspense and surprising plot twists, we continue to follow the lives of the people we loved in The Velvet Prison


 My Review


The gang is all grown up!

Travis and his companions seem to have a knack for finding and creating drama. The overall feel of this book reminded me of The Great Gatsby, with it's flare for dramatic and flamboyant situations and overall feel. While the characters all fit themselves, they each seemed to become a bit emotional - which was even noted in a joke by one of the characters.

While I enjoyed the progression of the story, I had been hoping for a different kind of story. The actions of each character were far more influenced by world events, which is fitting, but made it somewhat predictable and not quite as satisfying as the prequel. I suppose it's all in personal preference, but from the synopsis, I had simply been expecting something a bit different.

All that to say, this was still a good story. Seeing each character handle the different aspects of the confrontations made for an easy look at the different nations involved. While there didn't seem to be an overall point or message of the story, it was interesting to see the differences in the nations, and people dealing with war.

I did enjoy this book, and the plot twists surrounding several of the characters. The cultural differences of the period were portrayed well, and gives a stark contrast to the world we live in today. The author set the story up well, and the flow was far better than the previous book. I would recommend this to fans of The Velvet Prison, and would be interested in reading other books by this author.

*I was given a complimentary eCopy of this book, from the author, to read in exchange for an honest review.


Do you enjoy historical novels? Let me know in the comments below!

Thanks for visiting! Have a wonderful day! =D